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Reduce Lifestyle INFLAMMATION

 

Inflammation when acute (short lived) can be a good thing, it aids in recovery from injury and infections. However when it is chronic it can cause lots of unpleasant symptoms: physical, psychological, mental.  Chronic inflammation (low grade) is known as metafflamation. It is linked to toxicity, stress, and our modern diet and lifestyle.   It is common to people experiencing  chronic illness as well as “sensitisation” related pain  syndromes like fibromyalgia, and CFS. 

Making anti inflammatory lifestyle and dietary changes and also managing anxiety and stress can dial back pain and symptoms, and even lead to full remission for some people.  For people with lots and lots of symptoms, this does however tend to take time. However some improvements are usually felt pretty quickly. 

 This picture source CDC shows the difference between acute (healthy) inflammation and chronic inflammation

 inflammation

Here is a picture showing how our lifestyles have become more promoting of chronic inflammation (metaflammation) since the Industrial Revolution (source: CDC).  Metaflammation is mainly man made says Egger G1, Dixon J. 2009 inked to anthrogens (our lifestyle and changes to environment, including reduced air quality

picture2

Here are some of the things the CDC say are inflammatory and anti-inflammatory.

 
 
 
Evidence Level Pro-Inflammatory (“Anthropogens”) Anti-Inflammatory (or Neutral)
Strong

Aging

Exercise, too little (inactivity) Nutrition

Excessive energy intake Fat intake

Saturated

Trans fatty acids High-fat diet

Obesity/weight gain

Particulate matter

Smoking

Sleep deprivation Stress/anxiety/depression/ “burnout”

Exercise/physical activity/fitness

Intensive lifestyle change

Nutrition

Restricted energy intake

Fish/fish oils Fruits/vegetables

Nuts

Weight loss

Moderate

Nutrition

Fast food/Western-style diet

High omega 6:omega 3 ratio

Fiber (low intake)

Fructose

Glucose High-glucose/glycemic-index foods High glycemic load

Glycemic status

Air pollution Inequality/economic insecurity

Nutrition

Alcohol (moderate intake) Capsaicin

Cocoa/Chocolate (dark) Fiber (high intake)

Garlic

Grapes/raisins

Herbs and spices

Low omega 6:omega 3 ratio Mediterranean diet

Olive oil

Tea/green tea

Vinegar

Smoking cessation

Limited

Exercise, excessive Nutrition

Starvation

Alcohol (excessive/bingeing) Meat (domesticated) Sugar-sweetened drinks

Endocrine disrupting chemicals

Low perceived workplace fairness

Sick building syndrome

Secondhand smoke

Thermal comfort (eg, air conditioning) Low socioeconomic status

Nutrition

Breast milk

Dairy calcium

Eggs

Lean game meats Low-glycemic-index foods Monounsaturated fats

Soy protein

 

 

 

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