CSS Pain Syndromes


CONDITIONS / Wednesday, August 13th, 2014

Diagram by Dr Yunus

Picture source:fibromyalgia and overlapping disorders by Dr Yunus

There are many pain syndromes, they are very common. In fact they impact 1 in 10 people experience less severe pain syndromes like Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Around 1 in 100 people have many pain syndromes at the same time, and experience lots and lots of symptoms - physical, emotional and mental on a daily basis.  This tends to occur when a persons total stressor load is too high for their integrative defense systems (IDS) to cope with.  IDS is your nervous system, immune system and hormone (endocrine) system, working together via common cells and messagers to protect you,  and help your body and mind heal from trauma and daily stressors: physical, emotional, toxicant.

Pain Syndromes refer to  

Fibromyalgia, and related

  • IBS: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS);
  • PMS: Premenstrual Syndroms;
  • MPS: Myofacial Pain
  • TMJ: Temporal
  • TT: Tension headaches
  • OAB: Overactive Bladder Syndrome 
  • other related e.g. migraines, PTSD, CFS, Depression 

Pain Syndromes are sometimes referred to as Functional Nerve Disorders (FND) or functional pain syndromes.  They are also referred to as Central Sensitivity Syndromes (CSS) and sometimes environmental illness of Multi- Symptom lllnesses.

Explaining Central Sensitisation

Central Sensitisation plays are role in most chronic pain conditions, not just central sensitivity syndromes

Symptoms that may suggest CSS Pain Syndromes
Diagnoses, Self-diagnoses, and Symptoms that May Suggest Central Sensitization Syndrome (Especially If Copious)
Abdominal bloating Abdominal pain, chronic abdominal pain Adrenal insufficiency (self-diagnosed), adrenal fatigue Alopecia, hair loss, trichotillomania Anxiety Atypical facial pain Atypical or non-cardiac chest pain Autoimmune disorder (self-diagnosed) Autonomic disorder (self-diagnosed) Black mold, toxic black mold (self-diagnosed) Brain fog, fibrofog Burning mouth syndrome Burning tongue Candida or chronic yeast infection Chiari malformation Chronic low-back pain Chronic non-specific lightheadedness Chronic pain Chronic pelvic pain Chronic prostatitis Chronic tension or migraine headaches Chronic testicular or scrotal pain Chronic whiplash-associated disorders Chronic widespread pain Complex regional pain syndrome Delusions of parasitosis Depression or bipolar disorder Dizziness Edema or swelling complaints not evident on examination Ehlers–Danlos syndrome Fatigue or chronic fatigue Fibromyalgia, myalgic encephalitis Hormone imbalance Hyperventilation Hypoglycemia (self-diagnosed) Immune deficiency (self-diagnosed) Interstitial cystitis, painful bladder syndrome Irritable bowel syndrome Joint pains Low testosterone or hypogonadism (with normal test results) Lupus (self-diagnosed) Lyme disease, chronic Lyme disease (self-diagnosed) Meniere disease Morgellons disease (self-diagnosed) Multiple chemical sensitivities Multiple drug allergies or intolerances (self-diagnosed) Multiple food allergies or intolerances (self-diagnosed) Myofascial pain syndrome Palpitations Panic disorder, episodes, attacks Pelvic pain, chronic pelvic pain, premenstrual syndrome Polycystic ovary syndrome Porphyria (self-diagnosed) Post-deployment syndrome Post-traumatic stress disorder Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) Pseudotumor cerebri Schamberg disease, soft tissue tumors Sick building syndrome Sjögren syndrome (blamed for multiple symptoms) Temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular joint pain Thyroid disease (with normal test results, usually self-diagnosed) Tinnitus Vulvodynia, vulvar vestibulitis [http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4422459/]

Central Sensitisation can be explained as problems at the level of the brain and spinal cord (CENTRAL)

A nervous system in a wired, wound up and hyper-excitable state due to the way neuro-endo-immune cells communicate chemically and through other mechanisms.  (SENSITISATION)

These sensitised cells amplify , or make stronger, messages that we get from our senses. This can cause sensory stimuli that is not normally painful, (e.g. light touch, soft sound) to become painful. This is known as Allodynia, Hyperalgesia.

When ever we experience pain, it concerns the brain, and makes it anxious.  If you do not do something (e.g. remove the source of your pain (trigger), manage thought provoking anxiety through stress management and relaxation techniques) the brain can continue to turn up the volume on your pain. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diagnoses, Self-diagnoses, and Symptoms that May Suggest Central Sensitization Syndrome (Especially If Copious)

Diagnoses, Self-diagnoses, and Symptoms that May Suggest Central Sensitization Syndrome (Especially If Copious)

  • Abdominal bloating
  • Abdominal pain, chronic abdominal pain
  • Adrenal insufficiency (self-diagnosed), adrenal fatigue
  • Alopecia, hair loss, trichotillomania
  • Anxiety
  • Atypical facial pain
  • Atypical or non-cardiac chest pain
  • Autoimmune disorder (self-diagnosed)
  • Autonomic disorder (self-diagnosed)
  • Black mold, toxic black mold (self-diagnosed)
  • Brain fog, fibrofog
  • Burning mouth syndrome
  • Burning tongue
  • Candida or chronic yeast infection
  • Chiari malformation
  • Chronic low-back pain
  • Chronic non-specific lightheadedness
  • Chronic pelvic pain
  • Chronic prostatitis
  • Chronic tension or migraine headaches
  • Chronic testicular or scrotal pain
  • Chronic whiplash-associated disorders
  • Chronic widespread pain
  • Complex regional pain syndrome
  • Delusions of parasitosis
  • Depression or bipolar disorder
  • Dizziness
  • Edema or swelling complaints not evident on examination
  • Ehlers–Danlos syndrome
  • Fatigue or chronic fatigue
  • Fibromyalgia, myalgic encephalitis
  • Hormone imbalance
  • Hyperventilation
  • Hypoglycemia (self-diagnosed)
  • Immune deficiency (self-diagnosed)
  • Interstitial cystitis, painful bladder syndrome
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Joint pains
  • Low testosterone or hypogonadism (with normal test results)
  • Lupus (self-diagnosed)
  • Lyme disease, chronic Lyme disease (self-diagnosed)
  • Meniere disease
  • Morgellons disease (self-diagnosed)
  • Multiple chemical sensitivities
  • Multiple drug allergies or intolerances (self-diagnosed)
  • Multiple food allergies or intolerances (self-diagnosed)
  • Myofascial pain syndrome
  • Palpitations
  • Panic disorder, episodes, attacks
  • Pelvic pain, chronic pelvic pain, premenstrual syndrome
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome
  • Porphyria (self-diagnosed)
  • Post-deployment syndrome
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS)
  • Pseudotumor cerebri
  • Schamberg disease, soft tissue tumors
  • Sjögren syndrome (blamed for multiple symptoms)
  • Temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular joint pain
  • Thyroid disease (with normal test results, usually self-diagnosed)
  • Tinnitus
  • Vulvodynia, vulvar vestibulitis

[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4422459/]

 

 

 

 
 

References.

For list of scientific and medical articles on Central Sensitivity Syndromes click here 

Fibromyalgia and Overlapping Disorders: The Unifying Concept of Central Sensitivity Syndromes by Dr Yunus to read [Click Here] to read.

Pain Res Treat. 2012; 2012: 584573.
Published online 2011 Nov 17. doi: 10.1155/2012/584573
PMCID: PMC3236313
The Prevalence of Fibromyalgia in Other Chronic Pain Conditions
Muhammad B. Yunus *

Central Sensitivity Syndrome http://www.bcwomens.ca/Professional-Resources-site/Documents/Central%20Sensitivity%20Syndromes%20(CSS)%20one%20page%20summary.pdf

 

 

 


 

 

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